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Archive for the ‘vocabulary’ Category

Improving your vocabulary is always

After writing the post on “how often” I continued to think about different words. I thought about the words that my students used over and over.

Often students would use the phrase “very good” or “very well” when they were really trying to say something was…

meaningful: something that adds meaning or effects

valuable: something that adds value or worth

crucial: critical importance

essential: necessary

fundamental: something that has to do with the basic facts or principals

key: an essential component

significant: an important effect or meaning

critical: extremely necessary

important: of significance or value

or vital: urgently needed

These words all mean “important” but each adds a slightly different meaning.  Here are some sentences to help you see how you might use them.

Today is an important day. It’s the first day that our team will meet and begin to work together.

We hope that everyone will make a valuable contribution to the team project.

Good teamwork skills are critical to our success so one of our fundamental goals is to improve our ability to work together as a team.

The attitude of each team member will be key to our success.

It will be vital that everyone attend and participate in each team session because each person brings a essential skill to the process.

Together, we will look at the most crucial issues facing our school.

In order for our project to succeed we will need to create meaningful and practical guidelines for students to follow.

If we are successful, we could have a significant impact on the future of our school.

Now…this is really important! Knowing new words is valuable but using them is essential! So look up these words. Begin to use them in your conversation and writing. Practice. Learn. Most of all, enjoy!!!

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I’ve been thinking about words that describe how often something happens. There are many great English words that we can use depending on….well depending on how often!

How often do you study?  go to the mall? talk to your friends? have dinner with your parents? play a game? take a walk? watch television? go online? get your hair cut?

Starting with not doing something at all to doing it all the time, here are some words you can use to stretch your vocabulary. When there is more than one word that means about the same thing, I’ve inserted (or).

Not at all: I never seem to have time to get any exercise.

Not often: We rarely (or) seldom (or) hardly ever see squirrels in the city any more.

Sometimes: Occasionally, during the term, your teacher will meet with you to discuss your term project.

From time to time we can see the stars, but the smog is usually too thick.

Every so often, especially when we’re in a crowd,  my dog will just jump out of my arms and run away.

Often: He usually goes to the cinema on the weekends.

In the summer I frequently travel to the beach with my friends.

She loves art so she makes regular visits to the local galleries.

Very often: I see him all the time when I go to the park.

I walk daily, the first thing in the morning.

He is constantly forgetting to do his assignments.

Day in and day out you will find most students online doing research, watching movies or playing games.

Those two girls are always together.

Theirs is a never-ending love affair.

The planets are in perpetual motion.

Wow! Now you have many new words and phrases to use when you want to describe how often something happens. Try them out! Experiment! Take a risk! We say in English: Nothing ventured, nothing gained. This means you can only grow and improve if you try new things.

Study hard! Enjoy your English! Use a new word today!